Broken Down

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Broken Down

I took this photo because I like the broken down shed in the back.  It may have been a barn but it is not traditional looking as the big, red old barns do.  The attention of the photo starts with the fence and then takes you to the old shed.  Even the wheat grabs your attention along with the fence.  There are so many wonderful old buildings that are still standing and it makes you question what life was like when the farm was a family home with the vibrant pursuit of being a farmer.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary

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Red Old Barn

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Red Old Barn

“Many years ago, choices for paints, sealers and other building materials did not exist. Farmers had to be resourceful in finding or making a paint that would protect and seal the wood on their barns. Hundreds of years ago, many farmers would seal their barns with linseed oil, which is an orange-colored oil derived from the seeds of the flax plant. To this oil, they would add a variety of things, most often milk and lime, but also ferrous oxide, or rust. Rust was plentiful on farms and because it killed fungi and mosses that might grow on barns, was very effective as a sealant. It turned the mixture red in color.

When paint became more available, many people chose red paint for their barns in honor of tradition.”   This information was provided by the Farmer’s Almanac.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary Mikawoz

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/red-old-barn-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true

Broken Rims

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Broken Rims

This is a black and white photo of old broken rims.  They may even be off of the famous Red River Carts.  Red River Carts or charettes in French, were used during the fur trade in the Red River area.  One of the first carts was used in Pembina, North Dakota and expanded from there.  They were mainly pulled by oxen but also horses and mules.  The cart was so buoyant that it could float over streams yet strong enough to carry 1000 pounds.  One reason that the famous roads Portage Avenue and Main Street in Winnipeg, Manitoba are so large is because these Red River Carts were wide and so the streets today are wide and open compared to most other downtown areas around the world.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary Mikawoz

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Profile Face in Tree

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

I took this photo of the inside of a Californian Redwood tree and I found it remarkable to see the profile of a face.  It is a strong side view of a face with a forehead, an eye, nose and chin going down into a neck.  Can you see the image in the wood?

It is gnarled and old yet somehow very strong as a male figure.  I enjoy the browns, greens and other hues found in the wood. As well, I think the moss near the bottom of the face is an incredible green neon shade which is amazing to me because it naturally occurs in nature.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary

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Thank you for checking out my photographic work.

Seagull Sticks

Pretty much anywhere you go when you are near water; you will find Seagulls or Gulls. I read that these birds breed on every continent and even on the fringes of Antarctica and the North Arctic which I think is amazing.  I think this speaks to their hardiness and ability to adapt to various climates around the world.  I do realize they are mainly scavengers and so this explains their ability to sustain themselves.  Apparently, they can live a long time and often mate for life.  Their offspring are precocial which means they are able to be mobile upon hatching out of their eggs, among a few other things.  This photo that I took was on a lake which had these large pieces of wood sticking out of the water which I believe is being used to moor boats to near the shoreline.  It looks as if the Seagulls have taken over.  Enjoy!

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

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Thank you for checking out my Photography Image.