Hay Field

Mikawoz Hay Field

Hay Field

This is a beautiful hay field just north of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. I believe it is north of Gimli and Riverton on the way to Pinedock and Matheson Island.

“Hay is grass, legumes, or other herbaceous plants that have been cut and dried to be stored for use as animal fodder, particularly for large grazing animals raised as livestock, such as cattle, horses, goats, and sheep.” This is according to Wikipedia.

Unfortunately, hay is not grown as much now. The stalks of plant life has been modified so as to not be as long as they once were either.

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Winnipeg Floodway

Mikawoz Winnipeg Floodway

Winnipeg Floodway

On a plane trip back to the Winnipeg Airport we flew over the Winnipeg Floodway. Although it seems like it is a river it is just way too darn straight to be one. It is also known as the Red River Floodway and Duff’s Ditch after Premier Duff Roblin after his government implemented it after the disastrous 1950 flood. It has saved countless floods and money in this plains area.

According to Wikipedia, “It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 2000, as the floodway is an outstanding engineering achievement both in terms of function and impact.”

Thank you for viewing, liking, commenting, sharing and purchasing. Thanks for any and all support.

For bigger and fuller image, click here.

For a portfolio of creative work including art, photography and mixed media by Mary Mikawoz, click here.

For viewing recent images, click here.

Dragonfly on Tree

Mikawoz Dragonfly on Tree

Dragonfly On Tree

This is a beautiful dragonfly on a birch tree. I love dragonflies because they are beautiful as they hover and fly around and they eat mosquitoes too.

According to Wikipedia, “Fossils of very large dragonfly ancestors in the Protodonata are found from 325 million years ago (Mya) in Upper Carboniferous rocks; these had wingspans up to about 750 mm (30 in). There are about 3,000 extant species. Most are tropical, with fewer species in temperate regions. Loss of wetland habitat threatens dragonfly populations around the world.”

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For creative work by Mary Mikawoz, click here.

Toppled Wire Fence

Copyright Protected by Mary MIkawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary MIkawoz

Toppled Wire Fence

I really don’t have much to say about this photo other than I like the simplicity of it.  The strain of use over time has made this wire fence topple over at the post’s base.  I always find it interesting how you get not only white snow but blue hues when you photograph the shadows on snow.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/toppled-wire-fence-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true

Rainfall on Ocean

 Copyright Protected by Mary Miikawoz


Copyright Protected by Mary Miikawoz

This is a shot of Waikiki Beach in Oahu, Hawaii.  Over the ocean there are storm clouds in the sky and from the bottom, you can see how the rain has started on the ocean.  It was very difficult to get any photos as these beaches are almost always full of people swimming and riding the surf.  For once, I was able to capture it relatively quiet of people and in the pristine beauty of nature itself.  I have always enjoyed seeing rain from a distance.  On the prairies you can see the rain storm coming from far away.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary Mikawoz

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/rainfall-on-ocean-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true

Red Old Barn

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Red Old Barn

“Many years ago, choices for paints, sealers and other building materials did not exist. Farmers had to be resourceful in finding or making a paint that would protect and seal the wood on their barns. Hundreds of years ago, many farmers would seal their barns with linseed oil, which is an orange-colored oil derived from the seeds of the flax plant. To this oil, they would add a variety of things, most often milk and lime, but also ferrous oxide, or rust. Rust was plentiful on farms and because it killed fungi and mosses that might grow on barns, was very effective as a sealant. It turned the mixture red in color.

When paint became more available, many people chose red paint for their barns in honor of tradition.”   This information was provided by the Farmer’s Almanac.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary Mikawoz

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/red-old-barn-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true