Toppled Wire Fence

Copyright Protected by Mary MIkawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary MIkawoz

Toppled Wire Fence

I really don’t have much to say about this photo other than I like the simplicity of it.  The strain of use over time has made this wire fence topple over at the post’s base.  I always find it interesting how you get not only white snow but blue hues when you photograph the shadows on snow.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/toppled-wire-fence-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true

Advertisements

Rainfall on Ocean

 Copyright Protected by Mary Miikawoz


Copyright Protected by Mary Miikawoz

This is a shot of Waikiki Beach in Oahu, Hawaii.  Over the ocean there are storm clouds in the sky and from the bottom, you can see how the rain has started on the ocean.  It was very difficult to get any photos as these beaches are almost always full of people swimming and riding the surf.  For once, I was able to capture it relatively quiet of people and in the pristine beauty of nature itself.  I have always enjoyed seeing rain from a distance.  On the prairies you can see the rain storm coming from far away.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary Mikawoz

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/rainfall-on-ocean-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true

Red Old Barn

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Red Old Barn

“Many years ago, choices for paints, sealers and other building materials did not exist. Farmers had to be resourceful in finding or making a paint that would protect and seal the wood on their barns. Hundreds of years ago, many farmers would seal their barns with linseed oil, which is an orange-colored oil derived from the seeds of the flax plant. To this oil, they would add a variety of things, most often milk and lime, but also ferrous oxide, or rust. Rust was plentiful on farms and because it killed fungi and mosses that might grow on barns, was very effective as a sealant. It turned the mixture red in color.

When paint became more available, many people chose red paint for their barns in honor of tradition.”   This information was provided by the Farmer’s Almanac.

Thank you for liking, commenting and/or sharing.  Mary Mikawoz

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/red-old-barn-mary-mikawoz.html?newartwork=true