Porcupine Quills

Mikawoz Porcupine Quills

Porcupine Quills

This is a close-up of porcupine quills. I love to take close-ups especially of animals.

According to National Geographic, “Porcupines have soft hair, but on their back, sides, and tail it is usually mixed with sharp quills. … Porcupines cannot shoot them at predators as once thought, but the quills do detach easily when touched. Many animals come away from a porcupine encounter with quills protruding from their own snouts or bodies.”

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Beloved Tiger

Mikawoz Beloved Tiger

Beloved Tiger

I took this photograph of a tiger at a zoo. He is looking off into the distance.

I wrote this poem to go with the image. This is how I felt.

Beloved Tiger
by Mary Mikawoz (2020)

Off in a Distance
You Dream
Of Bygone Days
And Solitudes

Yet you Continue to Roam
In Your Mind
Of Distant Lands
Of Chasing Game
And Wildlife
Of Embracing Life

Your Path and Destiny has diverged
Once Upon a Time
To be Captive Here
For our Amusement
In this Human Zoo

Sorry for our Indulgences
Sorry for the captivity
One Day You Will be Free Again!

XXX

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Keen Sense

Mikawoz Keen Sense

Keen Sense

This beautiful and incredible mammal is reposing and relaxing on the green grass along some boulders. It was taken at the Assiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

According to the Internet,”Polar bears have a keen sense of smell, which they use to find prey. A polar bear can sniff out a seal on the ice 20 miles (32 kilometers) away, and can smell a seal’s breathing hole in the ice more than half a mile away, according to the National Zoo.”

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Dolphin

MikawozDolphin

Dolphin

I love dolphins and whales. This is a underwater picture of a dolphin. According to Wikipedia, “Dolphin is a common name of aquatic mammals within the infraorder Cetacea. The term dolphin usually refers to the extant families Delphinidae, Platanistidae, Iniidae, and Pontoporiidae, and the extinct Lipotidae. There are 40 extant species named as dolphins.”

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Elk Calf

MikawozElkCalf

Elk Calf

Elk babies are called calves and weigh around 31 to 35 lbs. (14 to 16 kg) when they are born. After just 20 minutes, a calf can stand on its own.

According to Wikipedia, “The elk or wapiti (Cervus canadensis) is one of the largest species within the deer family, Cervidae, and one of the largest terrestrial mammals in North America and Northeast Asia.”

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Close-Up

MaryMikawozLeopardHead

Close-Up

This is a photo I took of a close-up of a leopard’s head. He is magnificent – isn’t he? The leopard is one of the five extant species in the genus Panthera, a member of the Felidae. The leopard occurs in a wide range in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia.

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Gibbon Intently Looking

I took this photo but then had a hard time trying to remember what type of primate this was.  I thought it might have been an orangutan because of the orange colouring but the face was different. Plus, it has a smaller frame.  I finally figured out that this monkey is actually what is called Gibbon or a Lesser Ape.  Apparently, they pair bond which is different than the Greater Ape.  Plus, I learned that their primary form of locomotion is called “brachiation” where they can swing from branch to branch for distances of up to 15 meters or 50 feet  with speeds as high as 55 km/h or 34 mph.

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

Copyright Protected by Mary Mikawoz

 

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