Death and Dying

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Book: “What the Dead Are Dying to Teach Us: Lessons Learned From the Afterlife,” by Claire Broad, Watkins Publishing, 2019.

Book Review by Mary Mikawoz

Book available September 10, 2019

Claire Broad tries hard and for that I have to give her some credit. She has written a basic book about mediumship and what the dead are trying to teach us. It is a good beginner introduction but if you are aware of anything about what decease spirits are saying, it is repetitive from other sources. If you watch Long Island Medium, Mama Medium, Mom’s a Medium or have seen John Edward, Colette Baron-Reid, John Holland, James Van Praagh you should be aware of the major points spiritual people are making.

I found myself becoming quite busy and so had to leave the book mainly read but not entirely. It was a mistake because I was not “called” back to the book. I eventually came back to it to finish it off and give it a proper reading. I am sorry to say but much of what has been said in this book has been said by many others beforehand.

Here are the seven main points. “You are spirit or conscious awareness. Death is an illusion because consciousness is not confined. You are never alone. You can rise above fear. Love never dies as your life has purpose. Ask and it will be given. And nobody dies alone.”

To be fair, I went over my notes and I found that I liked Claire’s Call to Action sections.

To conclude, I would have to say that if you are dealing with death or are curious about the afterlife, this is a good introductory book. I give this book 3.5 stars out of 5. If you interested in life between lives, I would recommend the hypnotic work of Dr. Michael Newton of the Newton Institute.

Tags:  Claire Broad, Waktins Publishing, death, medium, mediumship, dead, spirit, spiritual, psychic, Long Island Medium, Mama Medium, John Edward, Colette Baron-Reid, John Holland, James Van Praagh, spirit, consciousness, illusion, fear, love, purpose, Dr. Michael Newton, Newton Institute, Mary Mikawoz, Mikawoz, Book Review

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Book: “Visualization for Weight Loss” by Jon Gabriel

Weight LossBook Review by Mary Mikawoz

The “Jon Garbriel Method” was the first book written by this author. I read it and thought it was interesting but did not actively pursue it or the visualization that he provided. Now, that I am faced with this second book, I am more intrigued. Jon uses visualization much in the way that Shakti Gawain suggests in her book, “Creative Visualization.” He has taken it one step further, however, and has made some excellent visualizations that look they would work.

They encompass using white light and predominantly the navel as a focal point. Other areas include the forehead. Both of these are near important chakra points and so the visualizations are more powerful.

Jon discusses stress, trauma and fear as factors in being overweight. It is not simply a process of calories in and calories out otherwise diets would work but they don’t. Dieting is an industry onto itself. The food industry system is into marketing processed foods that are cheap to produce and sustain on shelving and so not that good for the human body. The more raw and alive products with one ingredient is much more valuable to the body than products that have been laced with herbicides, pesticides, fungicides, chemicals and dyes.

Jon believes in visualization and offers a 16 week program near the end of the book in which he uses a variety of topics to serve as focal points for morning visualization sessions. In the evening, there is a visualization that you can fall asleep to.

Overall, I found the book to be informative because he backs up his work with scientific researched work which is nice to see. The most compelling part of the story is Jon’s own transformation. He went from plus 400 pounds down to 186 pounds. Plus, he does not have extensions of lose skin all over the place. In fact, he looks as if he never was fat. This is compelling evidence to me and although it may be anecdotal evidence, it is pretty convincing to me and serves as a ray of hope.

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.