Connecting to Akashic Records

Connecting Records

Book: “The Art of Connecting to The Akashic Record: The Unique Nepalese Meditation, by Leonid Altshuler MD, BooksGoSocial, 2019.

Book Review by Mary Mikawoz

Book available March 1, 2019

This book is so short that I read it in one evening which is both good and bad.

I feel as if its essence has been distilled into the short portion of this book. This means you don’t have to read a 300 page book that repeats its points in various ways. However, I find that Dr. Leonid Altshuler is an interesting person and as a psychiatrist, he would have some interesting things to say about his methodology and practice with his patients.

Perhaps, those with mental health issues are not so far or different from being psychic or spiritually connected in ways that the average person is not.

Dr. Altshuler reviews his process for achieving connection to the Akashic Records, the energetic force of all information in the past, present and future. If you follow along, you may be able to accomplish the same.

Fairy Fiction an Environmental Tale

Fairy fiction an environmental tale – Writer draws inspiration for novel from Lake Winnipeg

Article written by Danielle DaSilva – News Reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press (Sou’wester)

Book Launch at McNally Robinson's in Winnpeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Book Launch at McNally Robinson’s in Winnpeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Local writer Mary Mikawoz’s new novel transports young readers into a world of fairies, magical time travel, and environmental responsibility.

The Waverley Heights resident has penned Northern Lake Adventures: The Encounter, a 202 page fantasy-fiction story for 10 to 14-year-olds.

The inspiration for the self-published novel comes from Mikawoz’s personal experience building the family cottage off of Lake Winnipeg.

“The creative process was physically building our cottage, but also we were thinking about how we were impacting the environment. So that’s one of the messages in this book, the impact of people in the environment,” Mikawoz said.

The story follows a set of triplets as they realize how their actions are affecting the fairies that also inhabit the land. The narrative is told from three perspectives — that of the triplets, the fairies, and the narrator — and uses both first and third-person voice.

Along with fairies, the characters also encounter time portals that transport them to the past where they meet Vikings and other historical figures.

“I think that’s cool because the kids can travel anywhere in time and space and also the lessons they can learn along the way,” she said.

Mikawoz is also a substitute teacher in the Pembina Trails School Division and noticed some of the content she encountered in the classroom was not engaging. That got her thinking about telling a story that would get students interested in history and geography.

“I was teaching Grade 5 in one of the school divisions and we were reading a book in the classroom and I kept reading and I kept thinking I could write better than this and that was really my inspiration,” Mikawoz said. “I thought the material that we were reading in the classroom was inadequate and I thought I could write something that kids were more interested in and at the same time learn something.”

Mikawoz has also learned a bit about the publishing industry along the way. She single-handedly designed the book and the illustrations. The images were drawn by hand and then scanned into the computer where Mikawoz touched up the pictures with Adobe Illustrator.

She also had to search out an appropriate self-publishing company to get the hard copies printed.

She said it was quite the process and required countless hours, but made the decision to move forward.

“If you’re focused on spending a lot of time doing it you can’t do other things, so I just took the risk and did it,” she said.

Mikawoz plans to write a series of Northern Lake Adventure novels and has already started the second instalment.

To pick up a copy of Mikawoz’s book you can go to McNally Robinson Booksellers at 1120 Grant Ave., where it sells for $12 or get a digital copy for $2.99 in the iBooks store.

Northern Lake Adventures - The Encounter

Northern Lake Adventures – The Encounter

Book Launch Today

There is a book launch today for my book – Northern Lake Adventures at McNally Robinson’s in Grant Park Mall, Winnipeg at 7 pm in the Atrium.

Northern Lake Adventures - The Encounter

Northern Lake Adventures – The Encounter

http://mytoba.ca/entertainment/winnipeg-schoolteacher-releasing-magical-fantasy-book-for-kids/

Winnie the Bear’s Regiment is 100 Year Old Today!

Yes, if Winnie was alive today, she (not he) would be proud and pleased with  the men who surrounded her and helped her to become one of their own as mascot and member of the Fort Gary Horse family.  She would be happy that today, April 12, 2012 is the 100th anniversary of the Fort Garry Horse Regiment and would be saying “Happy Birthday” if she could.   When the regiment was but two years old, Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, was heading from Winnipeg to Québec in 1914.  Enroute they stopped in White River, Ontario where a hunter had shot and killed a mother bear.  The baby black bear cub was left without any care and so Lieutenant Colebourn, who was also a veterinarian, decided to buy her from the hunter for 20 dollars.  He had decided to call her “Winnie” after his home town of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

The bear travelled with the FGH to England as the Forces prepared to wage battle in Europe during the First World War.  When it was time to fight in France, Colebourn thought it was best that Winnie be left in the care of the London Zoo and so he did just that.  She did very well there to the point where children were able to ride her and dignitaries from all over came to have their photo take with Winnie. Many of these photos are archived at the London Zoo. She became quite the famous bear in her own right due to her calm nature and friendly disposition.

Lieutenant Colebourn had originally had plans to bring Winnie the Bear back to the Assiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg after the war, however, when he saw how well she had adjusted to the London Zoo, he decided this would be the best place for her to live.  She lived for 20 years until 1934.  During this time, many people saw the bear.  Two of these people were named A.A. Milne and E.H. Shepard who happened to be a writer and illustrator respectively.   It is interesting to note that Milne had taken his son, Christopher Robin, to see the bear, who became so enamoured by her that Christopher named his stuffed teddy bear after Winnie and this also inspired his father to write the “Winnie-the- Pooh” book in 1926 which also ended up featuring this very same son as a character in the now famous books.

This initial book and the three other books have formed the basis of many future continuing books, games and movies.  To this day, children around the world know the story of Winnie-the-Pooh bear but few people know the real roots of the story or the connectedness to the Fort Garry Horse Regiment of Winnipeg. Some real books have been written about the real story of Winne the Bear but few people know of them.  A couple of these books may be found in the library section of the Fort Garry Horse Museum.  Only recently was a movie produced by CBC called “A Bear Named Winnie” in 2004.  We should give thanks to Lieutenant Colebourn and the Fort Garry Horse Regiment for having saved this bear which has had a much bigger impact on the world than even they knew or suspected would or could occur.  Lieutenant Colebourn returned from the war and continued serving with the Fort Garry Horse unit.  He reached the level of Major. As a veterinarian, his practice was just down the street on Corydon Avenue not far from Confusion Corners.   One man’s actions such as Lieutenant Colebourn’s has become an instigation for many other deeds and effects.

We must remember certain facts.  Winnie was a real bear.  She came from Canada.  She was born in or around White River, Ontario and she is named after Winnipeg, Manitoba.  What is most important to understand and recognize is that had it not been for the tragedy of World War I in Europe and had it not been for the tragedy that Winnie’s mother had been killed, the circumstances that led her to being in England at that time would not have happened and the books of “Winnie-the-Pooh” either would not have happened or would have not been the same.  In addition, it is precisely because she was so well taken care of by Lieutenant Colebourn that she was able to develop a friendly disposition that attracted many people’s interest.   Because of these circumstances, the story has been written, illustrated and told.  For generations of people around the world, Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional character and is now loved as a favourite children’s classic but it was entirely based on actual bear named Winnie.  She was the real being.

As a reminder of this historical connectedness, there is a bronze statue of Lieutenant Harry Colebourn along with Winnie the Bear at Assniboine Park Zoo but did you also realize, that there is an exact replica of them at the London Zoo as well?  They are two symbols recognizing two key areas of Winnie the Bear and the connection to the Fort Garry Horse Regiment.

It is with pride today, on April 12, 2012 that Winnipeggers and other people around the world can recognize the Fort Garry Horse Regiment for their entire 100 year history inclusive of so many events and so many great deeds.  To help appreciate the history of the Fort Garry Horse, come out to the parades on Saturday, April 14, 2012 at the City of Winnipeg for 10:00 am and at the Manitoba Legislature for 11:45 am.  A new 100-year historial book called “Facta Non Verba” with 544 pages of information regarding the the Fort Garry Horse will be released this Friday and is available for sale.

For more information and details, see their website – http://www.fortgarryhorse.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=91&Itemid=99

Mary Mikawoz is a freelance writer, visual artist and photographer.  She is also a teacher and new media specialist.